THEME

historyofromanovs:

During her reign, Empress Elizabeth transformed a small summer palace into a splendid residence which eclipsed the fame of many European royal residences. The reign of Elizabeth I was a golden age of Russian Barocco. This elegant, exuberant style with elaborate ornamentation and dramatic lighting effects matched perfectly well the character of the empress. She was walking through the golden enfilade admiring her reflection in multiple mirrors. Today, this luxurious palace has become known as the Catherine Palace, named after Elizabeth’s mother, Empress Catherine I.

Source: baltic-vacation.com

"When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’ It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions?"
- Sandi Toksvig (via tomfjord, learninglog

The World’s Oldest Crown 
The crown was discovered in a remote cave in the Judaean Desert near the Dead Sea in 1961 among hundreds of other objects from the period. Known as the ‘Nahal Mishar Hoard’, more than 400 objects were discovered by Pessah Bar-Adon and his fellow Israeli archaeologists in the cave which became known as the ‘Cave of the Treasure’. The ancient relic, which dates back to the Copper Age between 4000–3300 B.C., is shaped like a thick ring and features vultures and doors protruding from the top. It is believed the crown played a part in burial ceremonies for people of importance at the time. 
(source)

The World’s Oldest Crown

The crown was discovered in a remote cave in the Judaean Desert near the Dead Sea in 1961 among hundreds of other objects from the period. Known as the ‘Nahal Mishar Hoard’, more than 400 objects were discovered by Pessah Bar-Adon and his fellow Israeli archaeologists in the cave which became known as the ‘Cave of the Treasure’. The ancient relic, which dates back to the Copper Age between 4000–3300 B.C., is shaped like a thick ring and features vultures and doors protruding from the top. It is believed the crown played a part in burial ceremonies for people of importance at the time.

(source)

ohlookhistory:

A heart locked with a key, and a secret message: the colored stones have initial letters that spell ‘REGARD’: ruby, emerald, garnet, amethyst, ruby and diamond. This arrangement of stones was also popular in ‘regard’ rings. The pendant opens to reveal a panel of woven hair under glass.

ca.1840, from the Victoria and Albert Museum. 

ohlookhistory:

A heart locked with a key, and a secret message: the colored stones have initial letters that spell ‘REGARD’: ruby, emerald, garnet, amethyst, ruby and diamond. This arrangement of stones was also popular in ‘regard’ rings. The pendant opens to reveal a panel of woven hair under glass.

ca.1840, from the Victoria and Albert Museum. 

jothelibrarian:

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another lovely illustration in grisaille, shades of grey, but highlighted with blues and gilding. Really lovely!
Image source: SCA 40. Creative Commons licensed by medievalfragments via Flickr.

jothelibrarian:

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another lovely illustration in grisaille, shades of grey, but highlighted with blues and gilding. Really lovely!

Image source: SCA 40. Creative Commons licensed by medievalfragments via Flickr.

mortisia:

San Martino - The Ossuary Chapel of San Martino Della Battaglia in Italy is the most ordered of all the bone houses on this list. Row upon row, column upon column of human remains rest in perfect order as if they were books in a macabre library. In all there are 2,619 deceased here with 1,274 skulls. [ source / edit ] 

mortisia:

San Martino - The Ossuary Chapel of San Martino Della Battaglia in Italy is the most ordered of all the bone houses on this list. Row upon row, column upon column of human remains rest in perfect order as if they were books in a macabre library. In all there are 2,619 deceased here with 1,274 skulls. [ source / edit


A quiet mosque in Palestine, 1926.Photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont, National Geographic Creative.

A quiet mosque in Palestine, 1926.Photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont, National Geographic Creative.

deathandmysticism:

Temple of Isis, Egypt, early 20th century

deathandmysticism:

Temple of Isis, Egypt, early 20th century

marthajefferson:

Queen Elizabeth I Original Chromolithograph
The Grammar of Ornament, the global and historical design sourcebook, Owen Jones - 1910 (source)

Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, Empress of India

Queen Victoria started a trend in engagement rings when she received a snake ring as her engagement ring. Snakes were seen as a symbol of eternal love. Her snake ring contained emeralds. During the period before the  Victorian era (and even during) engagement rings often bore the wife-to-be’s birthstone in them and in Victoria’s case her birthstone was an emerald.

Victoria loved her snake engagement ring that was designed especially for her by her beloved Prince Albert and it is believed that she was wearing it when she was buried.

tawnyscostumesandcuriosities:

Mary Queen of Scots’ Watch: Large SKULL WATCH given by the Queen to Mary Seton. The forehead of the skull is engraved with a figure of death between a palace and a cottage, and a quotation in Latin meaning ‘pale death visits with impartial foot the cottages of the poor and the castles of the rich’ (Horace). The skull is held upside down and the jaw lifted to read the silver dial. The hour is struck on a bell. Made by Moyant A Blois (1570-90).

tawnyscostumesandcuriosities:

Mary Queen of Scots’ Watch: Large SKULL WATCH given by the Queen to Mary Seton. The forehead of the skull is engraved with a figure of death between a palace and a cottage, and a quotation in Latin meaning ‘pale death visits with impartial foot the cottages of the poor and the castles of the rich’ (Horace). The skull is held upside down and the jaw lifted to read the silver dial. The hour is struck on a bell. Made by Moyant A Blois (1570-90).

centuriespast:

A locket with hair from Mary Shelley and her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley. CreditBodleian Library, Oxford

centuriespast:

A locket with hair from Mary Shelley and her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley. CreditBodleian Library, Oxford


Monogrammed ring of Catherine II of Russia, St. Petersburg, circa 1770

Monogrammed ring of Catherine II of Russia, St. Petersburg, circa 1770

teatimeatwinterpalace:

This handsome bookmark was made in 1840 and was given as a gift by the Duchess of Kent (Queen Victoria’s Mother) to Prince Albert on the day of his marriage to Queen Victoria—February 10.The gold bookmark was inserted into the prayer book which Prince Albert held on his wedding day. The structure of gold hangs from green silk ribbons. It is set with eight gemstones which spell out the name, “Victoria.” Let’s take a look at it, beginning with the deep red stone at the top, center.



V – Vermillion. This deep red stone is actually a garnet. At the time, it was commonly called “Vermeil” for vermillion as a description of its color. In modern jewelry terms, this can be quite confusing since the term now refers to silver which has been plated in a metallic blend of gold and other alloys. 






I – Jargoon. Yeah, I know. That doesn’t begin with an “I.” However, in 1840, a “J” was often used in place of an “I.” 






C – Chrysolite. Wow. This one actually means what it is and starts with the right letter. 






T – Turquoise. 






O – Opal 






R – Ruby 






I – Jargoon, again. By the way, this is a reddish-amber colored natural zircon. 






A – Amethyst

teatimeatwinterpalace:

This handsome bookmark was made in 1840 and was given as a gift by the Duchess of Kent (Queen Victoria’s Mother) to Prince Albert on the day of his marriage to Queen Victoria—February 10.

The gold bookmark was inserted into the prayer book which Prince Albert held on his wedding day. The structure of gold hangs from green silk ribbons. It is set with eight gemstones which spell out the name, “Victoria.” Let’s take a look at it, beginning with the deep red stone at the top, center.

V – Vermillion. This deep red stone is actually a garnet. At the time, it was commonly called “Vermeil” for vermillion as a description of its color. In modern jewelry terms, this can be quite confusing since the term now refers to silver which has been plated in a metallic blend of gold and other alloys. 
I – Jargoon. Yeah, I know. That doesn’t begin with an “I.” However, in 1840, a “J” was often used in place of an “I.” 
C – Chrysolite. Wow. This one actually means what it is and starts with the right letter. 
T – Turquoise. 
O – Opal 
R – Ruby 
I – Jargoon, again. By the way, this is a reddish-amber colored natural zircon. 
A – Amethyst
fortheloveofroyalty:

FTLOR’s 100 Favorite Royal Jewels (✰)

↳ 4. Empress Joséphine’s engagement ring

“The golden ring is in an 18th century setting called “toi et moi,” “You and Me,” with opposing tear-shaped jewels — a blue sapphire and a diamond. The carat weight of the two gems is a little less than a carat each. The ring sold for $949,000 by an anonymous buyer at auction in March 2013.”

fortheloveofroyalty:

FTLOR’s 100 Favorite Royal Jewels ()

↳ 4. Empress Joséphine’s engagement ring

The golden ring is in an 18th century setting called “toi et moi,” “You and Me,” with opposing tear-shaped jewels — a blue sapphire and a diamond. The carat weight of the two gems is a little less than a carat each. The ring sold for $949,000 by an anonymous buyer at auction in March 2013.”